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Posts Tagged ‘collaboration’

Ignite, Insight, Inspire

Ignite is a fun and fast-paced method to share the ideas you are passionate about.

The Melbourne KMLF is passionate about practising all that is new and effective in the world of Knowledge Management. Looking forward to this new year, we planned a number of refreshing topics, speakers and approaches, the first of which is an Ignite evening. So, what is Ignite?

Igniting an evening of knowledge sharing w/ Arthur Shelley
Imagine an environment where we want to get our idea across in 5 minutes. The message we want to share is captured in 20 slides that auto-advance every 15 seconds, to create an energetic pace in which we present and facilitate conversation that inspires new thoughts and ideas.

Participating in this event will:

  • Introduce you to Ignite (in the Ignite format)
  • Why the method works and how you can make it work for you
  • Putting Ignite to work

Knowledge Sharing – much used but poorly defined and understood w/ Peter Chomley
Peter will ignite a conversation about knowledge sharing; offer some insights and, hopefully, inspire a more informed understanding of the common ground.

Participating in this event will:

  • Share current thinking on knowledge and knowledge sharing
  • Explore the continuum of what how sharing occurs
  • Propose an Insight and Ignite a continuing conversation

Our reality is also our virtual experience w/ Helen Mitchell
Social media has been a buzz word for some time now. The web is continuing to change the way we communicate and share knowledge both personally, and for business. Yet there are mixed feelings about this for some.

Participating in this event will:

  • Explore how we communicate together, virtually, more than ever before
  • Do some time-travelling of popular disruptive innovations of the past
  • Consider how we find the balance and embrace the change

The Art of Conversation w/ Keith De La Rue
Conversation doesn’t just reshuffle the cards: it creates new cards. – Theodore Zeldin

Do you feel good after having a good conversation? New research is demonstrating that talking with each other actually makes us smarter – both as a group and individually – and that good conversations leads to better ideas.

Participating in this event will:

  • Provide new insight into how we can use conversation to be more innovative
  • Give you an update on some of the latest thinking in the field
  • Explain why social media is giving us tools to better handle complexity

Agenda: January 19

6:00-6:30 Networking with other thinking collaborators (over drinks and nibbles).

6:30-6:40 Arthur Shelley – Igniting an evening of knowledge sharing.
Although a research microbiologist by formal education, Arthur has spent the last ten years working on international projects requiring cultural change, relationship building and influencing how people adapt their work. Through this experience, he became aware of the importance of recognising behavioural patterns and engaging people in order to influence them to achieve mutually acceptable outcomes. Arthur has authored two books; The Organizational Zoo (Aslan Publishing with illustrator John Szabo) and Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (published by Ark Group).
twitter: @metaphorage

6:45-6:55 Peter Chomley – Knowledge Sharing – much used but poorly defined and understood.
Peter Chomley is at RMIT researching the influence of culture on knowledge sharing in innovation process within a trans-national corporation. He is also the VP of an Indian/Australian company specialising in business intelligence and healthcare informatics . In these and past roles he has gained insight into cross cultural organisational performance challenges. Previously he was a senior consultant in IBM.
Peter assisted in editing the 2000 2nd edition of: Internet Commerce – Digital Models for Business, published by John Wiley. A second book, Technology of Internet Business was edited and published by Wiley in 4Q2001. He has also co-authored a number of academic papers.
twitter: chomp45

7:00-7:10 Helen Mitchell – Our reality is also our virtual experience.
Helen is a communications professional, passionate about the possibilities we have today to connect, share and learn together, for organisations and individuals. With a focus on strategy, innovation and change for communications and knowledge-sharing functions, her most recent role was at CPA Australia as General Manager Knowledge Networks, where she led the establishment of key initiatives designed to connect ‘people to knowledge’ and ‘people to people’, regardless of geographic location.
twitter: @helmitch

7:15-7:25 Keith De La Rue – The Art of Conversation.
Keith De La Rue is Principal Consultant at AcKnowledge Consulting, and is one of the organisers of KMLF. He has worked in Knowledge Management for ten years. He also works in social media, and is an author and public speaker on KM and communications. Keith is passionate about sharing ideas and inspiring people.
twitter: @kdelarue

7:30-8:00 Informal conversation amongst the group to explore the ideas and concepts.

Our MC for the evening will be Andy Shaw (twitter: andyaus)
Please tweet on the evenings content with the #KMLF hash tag.

Venue: Room 13.3.011, RMIT Graduate School of Business and Law,Emily McPherson Building.
Corner of Russell & Victoria Streets, Melbourne. This room is on level 3 of the Franklin St Annex, two levels up from the Franklin St entry – or enter via the main Russell St Reception, go straight ahead through the student lounge and turn right to get to the annex, then go up one level.

View Future KMLF Events and other Knowledge activities at AUS KM Events calendar:

RSVP: by email to melbournekmlf@gmail.com

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“Design thinking is an approach that uses the designer’s sensibility and methods for problem solving to meet people’s needs in a technologically feasible and commercially viable way. In other words, design thinking is human-centered innovation.” Tim Brown, CEO, IDEO.

Design thinking is the new cool thing to talk about in your boardroom, bedroom, just about everywhere. But what exactly is it? How is it related to knowledge management and its practices?

We will explore both in conversation and hands-on fun:
•    What is design thinking?
•    What does design thinking mean in business and organisations?
•    What is the relationship between design thinking and knowledge management?
•    What can design thinking offer knowledge management (and vice versa)?

This is a story of two long lost brothers, on a journey to be united, and the rollercoaster ride along the way.

Participating in this event will enable you to:

  • Find out what all the fuss over design thinking is about
  • Develop an understanding of what design thinking brings to knowledge management (and vice versa)

Agenda:  Monday November 15

6:00-6:30    Networking with other thinking collaborators (over drinks and nibbles)
6:30-7:15    Zaana Howard:  Design thinking and knowledge management – brothers from different mothers
7:15-8:00    Informal conversation amongst the group to explore the ideas and concepts

Venue:

RMIT Graduate School of Business and Law, Corner Russell & Victoria Streets, Melbourne.
Emily McPherson Building, Lecture room 13.3.003 (One level up from Ground Reception).
Metered street parking nearby in Lygon Street.

RSVP: by email to melbournekmlf@gmail.com

About our Guest Speaker

Zaana Howard is a PhD student in the Faculty of Design at Swinburne University. Her research aims to investigate the practice of design thinking for organisation redesign and renewal. Zaana most recently worked at CPA Australia where her role focused on introducing collaborative and conversation based ways of working and learning, both online and face to face. This included developing online communities, managing corporate social media channels, and delivering innovative learning programs.

Zaana also has significant library management experience across special, academic and public libraries.

For more information go to: http://zaanahoward.com

View future KMLF Events and other knowledge activities at AUS KM Events calendar

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Knowledge Risk and Retention – beyond the usual suspects

In 2003 Kate Andrews introduced the term knowledge risk to describe the loss of knowledge critical to a firm’s performance.   In our experience, even today many organisations who are deeply concerned about potential knowledge loss from imminent staff exit DO NOTHING because there is no clear starting point.  This session will take a fresh look at risk and retention, with a focus on what is working in practice.   Questions will be posed and responses generated through discussion and reflection. 

  • Knowledge risk is not evenly spread throughout your firm:  you are likely to have particular knowledge risk hotspots. What are some ways to identify where they are?
  • It’s not all or nothing:  effective knowledge transfer focuses on unique, critical knowledge rather than trying to transfer everything known by everyone!  How can we identify the critical subset of expert knowledge?
  • Targeted knowledge transfer is a prime tool to mitigate knowledge risk.  Benefits of knowledge transfer include: retention of valuable, ‘can’t buy’ knowledge when key staff leave; reduced hand over risk through a structured knowledge transfer effort; and better supporting your key staff by building knowledgeable teams around them.  What organisational factors influence effective knowledge transfer?

Participating in this event will enable you to

  • Identify knowledge risk hotspots in your organisation 
  • Take a fresh look at knowledge transfer and retention options

Agenda:  Wednesday February 24th 2010

6:00-6:30          Networking with other thinking collaborators (over drinks and nibbles).

6:30-7:15          Dr Kate Andrews – Knowledge Risk and Retention – beyond the usual suspects

7:15-8:00          Informal conversation amongst the group to explore the ideas and concepts.

Venue: 

RMIT Graduate School of Business and Law, 300 Queen Street. Melbourne

Lecture room 158.1.2C (Ground level – just behind reception).

Ample metered street parking nearby in Queen Street (between La Trobe and Little Lonsdale).

 

RSVP: by email to melbournekmlf@gmail.com

About our Guest Speaker

Kate Andrews is an organisational psychologist who has worked in knowledge management for over a decade.  Her doctoral research highlighted psychosocial factors affecting knowledge sharing[1] and remains influential.  She is principal of knowledge asset consultancy KNOWABLE knowable.com.au, Adjunct Professor at QUT’s Faculty of Science and Technology and has lectured in KM at post-graduate level for Mt Eliza Business School as well as in Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia.   Her current knowledge risk assignments include projects with Water Corporation, Perth; Main Roads, Queensland; Sustainability Victoria; Valuer-General Victoria; and TAFE NSW.

 


[1] Influences on knowledge processes in organizational learning: the psychosocial  (2000) KM Andrews, BL Delahaye – Journal of Management Volume 37 Issue 6, Pages 797 – 810  – article has over 150 academic citations

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Topic:  User Adoption Strategies for Collaboration Technologies

What is the biggest complaint around the introduction of new collaboration technologies into a group or organization? The answer: No one uses them.

New tools are often rejected.  The very people who are supposed to use them don’t do so—they keep going with earlier ways of working.  Sometimes “culture” is blamed for this failure, but our speaker, Michael Sampson believes it is more accurate to point the finger at the lack of intentional effort on user adoption.

This discussion session provides an opportunity to learn about user adoption strategies, how other organizations around the world are tackling user adoption for collaboration technologies, and to share what strategies are working well in your organization.

Participating in this event will enable you to:

  • Learn about the current state of play with user adoption strategies
  • Develop your thinking about the user adoption strategy for collaboration technologies at your organization.

Agenda:  Monday February 15th

6:00-6:30      Networking with other thinking collaborators (over drinks and nibbles).

6:30-7:15      Michael Sampson – User Adoption Strategies

7:15-8:00      Informal conversation amongst the group to explore the ideas and concepts.

Venue: 
RMIT Graduate School of Business and Law, 300 Queen Street. Melbourne
Lecture room 158.1.2C (Ground level – just behind reception).

Ample metered street parking nearby in Queen Street (between La Trobe and Little Lonsdale).

 

RSVP: by email to melbournekmlf@gmail.com

About our Guest Speaker

Michael Sampson is a Collaboration Strategist. He helps end-user organizations in New Zealand, Australia, the United States, Europe and other places around the world improve the performance of distributed teams.  Key themes are the effective use of collaboration technology to enhance distributed teams, using SharePoint for collaboration, and encouraging user adoption of collaboration technologies.  Michael has written two books on collaboration strategy, and is about to publish a third.  Michael is running a Masterclass on SharePoint Collaboration and Governance in Melbourne on Tuesday 16th, for details see:  http://www.sharepointroadmap.com/melbourne.html

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Go is the most revered of Asian strategy board games.

But simply calling Go a game is like calling the space shuttle a glider. The game has been used for centuries to discuss and model political, economic and military strategy in China and Japan.

Often Go has been compared to Chess to highlight the differences between Eastern and Western thought, but recently David Snowden of Cognitive Edge commented that Chess and Go can be used to highlight the differences between the “Complicated” and “Complex” domains respectively.

Come along to learn about this fascinating subject. Play a few games then learn about complexity theory and how it applies to business strategy today.

We have a few boards, but if you have a notebook computer, please bring it along as Go software will be supplied for you to take away.

Participating in this event will

  • Introduce you to the concepts of complexity theory and David Snowden’s Cynefin framework,
  • Give you a grasp of how understanding complexity can help in your business projects,
  • And may just begin a life-long fascination with a game of intriguing mystery that will change the way you think about everything.

Agenda:  Wednesday January 27th

6:00-6:30      Networking with other thinking collaborators (over drinks and nibbles).

6:30-7:15      Stuart FrenchComplexity & the game of Go

7:15-8:00      Informal conversation amongst the group to explore the ideas and concepts.

Venue: 

RMIT Graduate School of Business, 300 Queen Street. Melbourne
Lecture room 158.1.2B (Ground level – just behind reception).

Ample metered street parking nearby in Queen Street (between La Trobe and Little Lonsdale).

 

RSVP: by email to melbournekmlf@gmail.com

About our Guest Speaker

Stuart is the IT/KM Projects manager at Daniels Sharpsmart, an Australian based global business in the medical waste technology industry.  An avid KM’er, author of the DeltaKnowledge.net blog and enthusiastic participant in a range of social networking forums, he has a Masters Degree in KM.  His research project investigating the impacts of organisational culture on the use of Wikis has highlighted a number of interesting perspectives in how we can motivate others to become involved in better knowledge interactions.

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Matching Collaboration Tools and Culture

Stuart French

May 27

 

If you read anything on the implementation of KM or Social Media tools in your business, you will come across the statement “A compatible corporate culture is critical for success.”

 

So what is corporate culture?

Can you describe yours in 3 dot-points?

 

This interactive session discusses ways to think about the concept of corporate culture and identify possible conflicts and compatibilities with Enterprise 2.0 tools.  It is based on a case study of an Australian, high-tech SME and is underwritten by findings from the speaker’s Masters Thesis on Wiki use in Small to Medium Enterprise.

 

Agenda:

6:00-6:30          Networking with other thinking collaborators (over drinks and nibbles).

6:30-7:15          Stuart French: Matching Collaboration Tools and Culture

7:15-8:00          Explore the ideas and concepts with Stu and others over more drinks & nibbles.

 

Venue: 

RMIT Graduate School of Business, 300 Queen Street. Melbourne

Lecture room 158.2.5 (one level up from reception).

Ample metered street parking nearby in Queen Street (between La Trobe and Little Lonsdale).

 

RSVP: by email to melbournekmlf@gmail.com

 

About our guest speaker:

Stuart is the IT/KM Projects manager at Daniels Sharpsmart, an Australian based global business in the medical waste technology industry.  An avid KM’er and enthusiastic participant in a range of social networking forums, he has just completed his Masters Degree in KM.  His research project investigating the impacts of wikis on the culture of the organisation has highlighted a number of interesting perspectives in how we can motivate others to become involved in better knowledge interactions.

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Hi Everyone,

It was great to attend my first KMLF on Thursday night. Shawn touched on Network Collaboration in his presentation, which then got everyone chatting about online collaboration tools and their potential and real value within organisations. I think everyone was in absolute agreement that an ongoing issue within organisations was the focus on getting a ‘tool’ rather than thinking of what their business issues or objectives where and what tools and methods could be used to solve them.

One resource which I mentioned may be of interest is the Headshift Casefiles Wiki. It has around 100 case studies of successful enterprise social tool projects from all over the world (and growing) as well their use cases. The use case is basically the business issue they were trying to resolve or behaviour they tried to foster. This is an open resource so if you have a project you have been involved in or come across which may be relevant, you can contribute.

If you have any questions, please let me know.

Look forward to seeing you next month.

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